Stop the Hate Day in Fresno

The City of Fresno declared June 7 as Stop the Hate Day at a well-attended ceremony in front of City Hall. Photo by Eduardo Stanley
The City of Fresno declared June 7 as Stop the Hate Day at a well-attended ceremony in front of City Hall. Photo by Eduardo Stanley

The City of Fresno declared June 7 as the initial Stop the Hate Day. In recognition of the Stop the Hate coalition’s work, City Council President Annalisa Perea, Mayor Jerry Dyer, Fresno Police Chief Paco Balderama and members of the City Council acknowledged June 7 and every day as Stop the Hate Day in the city of Fresno.

Cyndee Loryang, program manager for the Stop the Hate program at the Fresno Center, said, “Our message is clear: There is no room for hate in our community, and we are committed to it not being tolerated here.”

Cyndee Loryang holding the Stop the Hate resolution passed by the City of Fresno. Photo by Eduardo Stanley
Cyndee Loryang holding the Stop the Hate resolution passed by the City of Fresno. Photo by Eduardo Stanley

The Stop the Hate coalition is a group of 20+ grassroots groups that have held town halls in many communities, held know your rights workshops and educated community members about what to do if you are a victim of a hate crime or witness one. It is important to know what to do to de-escalate a potentially violent situation.

A recent hate crime in Fresno happened at the Porchfest music festival in the Tower District. A pro-Palestinian woman, who had set up a table distributing information about the situation in Gaza, was verbally assaulted and then physically attacked by Francisco Samaniego, who was later arrested on battery, robbery, violation of civil rights and vandalism charges.

The Fresno County District Attorney did not file hate crime charges against Samaniego. That is why the Stop the Hate coalition is needed—to stand in solidarity with victims of hate crimes and demand justice.

“We are still working hard toward seeking justice for recent events,” said Perea, “but it is through the collaborative efforts that I still believe that justice will be served.”

Part of the audience at the Stop the Hate event in front of Fresno City Hall. Photo by Eduardo Stanley
Part of the audience at the Stop the Hate event in front of Fresno City Hall. Photo by Eduardo Stanley

The Stop the Hate resolution passed by the City of Fresno emerged from the Stop the Hate coalition and has been signed by dozens of grassroots organizations, religious groups, labor unions and elected bodies such as the Fresno City Council. If your group would like to sign it, visit fresnoalliance.com/resolution/.

The popular “Stop the Hate, Be the Love” yard signs (now in their third printing) are available for free upon request. You can pick up one at 4773 N. Arthur Ave. in Fresno.

A four-minute video of the Stop the Hate Day announcement is available at youtu.be/sLZCiKcfttU.

This video, photos and article are supported in whole or in part by funding provided by the State of California, administered by the California State Library in partnership with the California Department of Social Services and the California Commission on Asian and Pacific Islander American Affairs as part of the Stop the Hate program. To report a hate incident or hate crime and get support, visit cavshate.org.

Author

  • Mike Rhodes

    Mike Rhodes is the executive director of the Community Alliance, was the editor of this newspaper from 1998 to 2014 and the author of several books. Contact him at mikerhodes@fresnoalliance.com.

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